13May

Exploring Our Experiences With Place-based Learning

by Naomi Radawiecnradawiec

 Vancouver Island University

13May

A Primer for Doing Teacher Action Research: Teachers as Bricoleurs

by Jim Parsons

Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta

13May

Reciprocating Interventions

by Renae Stevenson

Renae Stevenson is an active police officer in Abbotsford, BC, with more than 20 years of investigative experience and 15 years of coaching experience with youth in community sports. Prior to policing, she was a youth worker. She is trained as a mindfulness teacher from UC San Diego's School of Medicine (MBSR), holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminology from the University of Alberta, and completed a Master’s Degree in Leadership from Trinity Western University in 2018.

8May

Educational Action Research as a Global Competence in a Digital World

by Thomas G. Ryan

Thomas G. Ryan, Professor of Graduate Studies - Nipissing University 

22Mar

VIDEO: Rethinking Equity - The Critical Driver of Educational Policy

Stephen Murgatroyd narrates a fascinating and wide-ranging presentation that explores the links between educational inequity and social inequity, and contrasts the 'GERM' (Global Educational Reform Movement) model with the 'Equity' model - advocating for the latter as a better framework for educational policy and a key driver for positive social change.  

8Jan

The French Leader In A Second Language Classroom

By Natasha E. Feghali

What could leadership look like in a French Second Language (FSL) classroom? Can we conceptualize a self-run program where students autonomously learn and create within their own capacities? Can we mirror what international schools are doing? In a deeper more philosophical sense, can we help students in a FSL environment become engines of their own learning? I have some thoughts.

12Dec

Uplifting the Teaching Profession

By Jim Parsons and Dennis Shirley

The piles of contradictory research available about education today can be baffling. Some days, we feel we have no choice but to just throw up our hands in despair. How shall these conflicts be sorted out? Foundationally, we believe no sorting out will occur without teachers in the room. Teachers know much that often doesn’t find its way into policy. Here’s one thing we know. The task of including teachers in policy building is crucial because the conditions under which teachers work cannot be removed from their abilities to help students learn. This begs the question: What do teachers need to do their work well?